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Frey Vineyards
 
March 14, 2019 | Frey Vineyards

Wildlife near Frey Organic Vineyards

In 2015 we set up an automatic camera in protected forestland near our organic vineyards to learn more about the local wildlife.  The camera was placed at a spring high up the mountain.  What a surprise it was to discover that so many animals visited to bathe and drink, including bears, foxes, deer, and many species of birds.  The abundance of bears was especially surprising, as the shy and elusive creature is rarely spotted in person.

Another surprise was footage of a fisher (Pekania pennanti), a sleek and cat-like member of the weasel family, widespread in Canada.  A narrow branch of their territory reaches southward to the northern Rocky Mountains, the Cascade Range in Oregon, the High Sierras, and amazingly along the Northern Coast Range of California where Frey Vineyards is located.  It’s a beautiful creature that needs forestland to survive. 

In 2016 we added a second camera at a bear wallow about a half mile from the first camera.  Familiar faces appeared such as one particularly large, tranquil behemoth of a bear, as well as a wary bear always looking over his shoulder.  In the following years we added a couple more cameras, most of which were lost in the great fire that swept through our area in 2017.  The one that survived captured scenes of a slow-moving forest fire, which we’ll post soon.

The wildlife just a short walk from our home and vineyards reminds us about the importance of farming sustainably and organically, without synthetic pesticide drift to contaminate the water and ecosystems that sustain all of us.  We hope you support organic food production by choosing organic when you can.

 

Check out our YouTube channel for the short versions.

 

Time Posted: Mar 14, 2019 at 10:59 AM
Tamara Frey
 
March 1, 2019 | Tamara Frey

Recipe: Asparagus Filo Basket with Tarragon Hollandaise

By Chef Tamara Frey
 

Enjoy lightly braised asparagus and wine-infused Portobello mushrooms in a basket of flaky filo, blanketed with a tarragon hollandaise.  The steps are simple and the medley of flavors will wow your guests.  We served it with a bottle of Frey Organic Pinot Noir.  So good!

Asparagus spears rest ina filo basket with tarragon hollandaise

Ingredients:
1 box filo dough
5 large Portobello mushrooms (can use other mushrooms)
2 pounds fresh asparagus
2 pounds unsalted butter
1 jar roasted red peppers
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
1 large lemon
1 1/2 teaspoons tarragon
2 pinches cayenne
1/2 cup Frey Pinot Noir
salt and pepper for seasoning

Make the filo baskets
Filo dough comes frozen, so leave the box in the refrigerator for a day to thaw before gently unrolling the sheets.  The sheets I used came in rectangular size of 13 x 18 inches, so after applying the butter and stacking, I cut each in half to 13 x 9 inch rectagles.  While working with one sheet, cover the rest with a cloth to prevent from drying out.

Melt 1 and a half sticks of unsalted butter in a sauté pan.  Start by gently laying out one of the filo sheets and brush on the melted butter with a pastry brush.  Take another sheet and put it on top of the buttered sheet.  Continue layering the filo sheets this way, with the melted butter in between each sheet until you have 8 layers.  If a sheet tears, as it often does, just patch it up with a piece of filo using a dab of melted butter as glue.

With your 8 layers stacked, cut in half down the middle.  Grab one of the stacks and fold the sides in at about half-inch increments until you build up the sides a bit to create a simple basket about 4 x 5 inches.  Bake in oven at 375-degree for approximately 12 to 15 minutes, until top and bottom are nicely browned and the basket has puffed up.  Set cooked filo baskets aside.  (If making the baskets a day ahead, store in a cool place covered with plastic wrap, then flash heat in a 300 degree oven when ready to assemble.)

Prepare the mushrooms
Thinly slice the mushrooms.  Melt in a sauté pan 5 tablespoons of unsalted butter.  Sauté the sliced mushrooms a few minutes until done.  Add 1/2 cup of Frey Organic Pinot Noir and reduce the juices until a bit thickened.  Add salt and pepper to taste.  Set aside.  (May need to reheat when it is time to assemble the baskets.)

Prepare the asparagus
Rinse the asparagus.  Holding one spear in both hands, gently crack it where it naturally breaks. Repeat with all the asparagus spears and discard the bottom parts.  Melt 4 tablespoons unsalted butter in a sauté pan, add the juice of 1/2 a lemon, and sauté the asparagus on medium heat until al dente, which is still a bit crispy, or you can cook it to your liking.  Set aside.  (May need to reheat when it is time to assemble the baskets.)

Prepare the hollandaise
Hollandaise can be tricky as we all know.  People are afraid to attempt it.  The following is a simple hollandaise recipe using a Cuisinart that I’ve had immense success with.  Years ago when I had a little cafe and labored over the classic water-bath hollandaise method, one of the other cooks gave me this fabulous recipe.  I have never gone back to the classic French method I learned in culinary school.  I love that the consistency of this recipe holds its own every time.  It is the one-one-one method: 1 egg, 1 yolk, 1 lb. butter.  Here it is:

Melt a pound of unsalted butter in a saucepan on medium to low heat.  The melted butter cannot be too hot, nor too cold.  Lukewarm is perfect.  While the butter’s melting, put the large egg and the large egg yolk in the Cuisinart. Let it run for a minute or so until the mixture becomes light-yellow and creamy, and warmed by the Cuisinart.  Then, very slowly, in a thin stream, pour the warm melted butter into the mix while Cuisinart is running.  Turn off machine and test for thickness by carefully putting a spoon in the hollandaise.  If the spoon comes out coated, without the hollandaise running down the spoon, then consistency is good.  Turn on the Cuisinart again and add the juice of half a lemon, one and a half teaspoons of the tarragon, a pinch or two of cayenne and salt.  Pulse the Cuisinart and mix, then taste for seasoning.  Adjust as needed.  You might enjoy more lemon juice or more of a kick with the cayenne.

Prepare the Roasted Red Peppers
Slice in thin strips and set aside.

Assemble the asparagus baskets
Best to serve the filo basket, mushrooms and asparagus piping hot, as all three cool quickly.
Place a filo basket on a plate.
Place two or three spoonfuls of mushrooms in the filo basket.
Then 4 or 5 asparagus spears.
Partially blanket the mushrooms and asparagus with the warm hollandaise.
Lay 2 roasted red pepper strips in an X pattern across it all.

Serve and enjoy!

Copyrighted 2019, Tamara Frey

Frey Vineyards
 
December 19, 2018 | Frey Vineyards

Molly U.’s Cranberry Sauce

A wonderful recipe from an Organic Wine Club member.  Cover a 12 oz. bag of organic fresh cranberries with Frey organic red wine of your choice. Simmer a few minutes, until berries swell.  Off heat.  Add 1/2 cup chopped candied ginger, 1/2 cup (or less) raw sugar, zest and juice of one lemon.  Cover and let sit a few minutes, and enjoy!

Bowl of cranberry sauce with three persimmons on the side

 

Frey Vineyards
 
November 30, 2018 | Frey Vineyards

New Winery Under Construction – Video Update for November 2018

A quick video update on the progress of our new winery.

 

Lisa Batson
 
August 15, 2018 | Lisa Batson

Summer Peach Sangria

Organic sangria with frey wine

Perfect for a summer’s evening is this refreshing twist to the classic beverage, white wine peach sangria!

Ingredients:
3 ripe peaches
1 handful fresh mint
1 bottle Frey Organic Viognier
2 table spoons simple syrup
¼ cup Elderflower liquor
Lots of ice

Slice 3 ripe peaches.  Put peaches, mint, a bottle of Frey organic Viognier and the syrup into a large mason jar or pitcher.  (Optional: a splash of St. Germain, ¼ cup or more, to taste.)  Refrigerate and marinate for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight.  As the sangria marinates, the peaches may turn a little brown after a few days.  This may look unappealing, but the flavor is much improved.  If serving to guests we recommend straining out the browned peaches and adding fresh sliced peaches as well as a handful of fresh mint.  Serve over ice and enjoy on a warm summer evening!

Nicole Paisley Martensen
 
June 13, 2018 | Nicole Paisley Martensen

BioFiltro Water Filtration System

Cycle of worms

It takes a lot of energy to turn water into wine.  In fact, it takes an average of 6 gallons of water in the cellar to produce 1 gallon of wine.  At Frey Vineyards, water is used during the winemaking process for steam-cleaning and sterilizing tanks and equipment, and during harvest season it’s used for flushing out grape stems and seeds from the crusher.  The most common conventional method for treating process water from wineries is an aeration pond, which requires constant electricity to pump and reintroduce oxygen.  The aeration method is not only energy intensive, it’s also noisy and stinky, as the process can take days, if not weeks, to restore oxygen into the water.  What if there was another way to recycle process water back to a beneficial state where it could be re-used for irrigation, without using a tremendous amount of energy and disrupting wildlife (and human life) at the winery?

Enter BioFiltro, an international wastewater treatment company with a patented filtration system that naturally regenerates process water in four hours.  Frey Vineyards first met BioFiltro when our winemaker, Paul Frey, attended a Unified wine show where BioFiltro presented their innovative biological process.  BioFiltro’s patented BIDA® system is a passive aerobic bioreactor that catalyzes the digestive power of earthworms to naturally filter the water after the winemaking process.  This chemical-free system removes grape skins, grape seeds, sugars, and other organic compounds from the water and regenerates millions of gallons of water per year to be used for irrigation and frost protection in our vineyards.  Not only is the BIDA® system extremely energy efficient in its technology (it uses up to 85% less energy than the conventional aeration method), it also generates 75-100 cubic yards of worm castings to be used onsite to enrich our soil, increasing the value of this simple and elegant closed-loop system.

How do these hard-working worms do the heavy-lifting?  The BioFiltro BIDA® system starts with an open-top concrete basin that is layered up with strata of wood shavings, river cobble, and drainage basins.  During start up, BioFiltro inoculates the system with worms and microbes hungry for grape sugars and solids left over from the winemaking process.  Water is pumped across the system with sprinklers, and it gravity feeds down through the layers.  In the top layer, earthworms munch on larger solids and produce castings rich in microbes and bacteria.  By working beneficially and symbiotically together, the organisms form a biofilm, or layers of billions of microbial colonies, that capture, retain, and digest food found in the process water. This film is simultaneously aerated by the worms themselves who are busy moving throughout the system in search of food.  From top to bottom, the process takes four hours.

BIDA layers

At Frey, our BIDA® system will consist of two beds that are approximately 40’x80’ and 5’ tall.  Our system has the capacity to process 10,000 gallons of winery grey water per day, which is the equivalent of 600 showers!  The recovered water then gets pumped into our irrigation ponds, where it is stored for future agricultural use throughout the year.

Drawing on simple biological processes that Charles Darwin observed almost 140 years ago, BioFiltro capitalizes on the symbiotic harmony of earthworms and bacteria to deliver a biofiltration system that revitalizes water so we can conserve a precious resource.  “When I first met Paul and Johnny Frey [our winemaker and assistant winemaker], they understood everything in a second,” says Mai Ann Healy, of BioFiltro.  “After being at the Biodynamic conference last month, it seems like our company has a parallel challenge of showing how returning to the roots of employing natural processes is truly the home run.”

“We were impressed with the simplicity and energy efficiency of BioFiltro’s system,” says assistant winemaker Johnny Frey.  “We are also happy to have the compost-enhancing worm castings as a byproduct and return nutrients to the soil.”  As water scarcity is increasing everywhere, we felt it was an important time to better manage our water footprint.  We’re looking forward to using our BIDA® system at our new winery, and we’re excited about including our BioFiltro tanks on our future winery tours and raising awareness about resource conservation.

Happy worms at home
Happy worms!

Here are photos of the basins under construction at our new winery site.  Stay tuned for more updates and photos!

Building the forms for the worm bed
Johnny Frey building the forms for the worm basin.

Pouring the worm bed

Pouring cement for the worm basins

Pouring cement for the worm basin

 

Katrina Frey
 
June 13, 2018 | Katrina Frey

Great Horned Owl in the Moonlight

May 31st   It was five AM, the night after the full moon.  Still brilliant, the moon was about to set in the west, just before dawn.

I was awakened with a blast of sound,  “Hoo, hoo, hoo dat” answered by a more distant “Hoo, hoo, hoo dat.”  Convinced that a huge owl was just outside our trailer, I crept out into the pearly landscape.  I stood in the meadow and got my bearings, then realized the owls must be at least 150 yards away in the burnt forest by the pond. The skeletal ponderosa pines still tower and the great horned owls were perched on them, calling back and forth.  These owls, also called cat owls because of their perky ears, are the apex predators, able to pounce on prey as large as rabbits, possums and porcupines.  I imagined that their hunting must be eased after the fire, with no needled or leafy branches to block their view.

The calling went on for another ten minutes and then I guessed they found their prey, then each other, and bedded down for the dawning day.

great horned owl

Time Posted: Jun 13, 2018 at 10:00 AM
Eliza Frey
 
June 11, 2018 | Eliza Frey

The vineyards live on!

Cover crop between the vines

We had a mild spring, which makes life pleasant for farmers and grapevines.  Cover crops grew thick and luscious; the cool weather allowed them to build a lot of biomass before flowering.  As they are incorporated into the soil they add rich organic matter.  Mild weather is also good for the flowering of the vines.  Grape flowers are very delicate and extreme weather in either direction can affect the vines’ ability to set a good crop of fruit.  Grape flowers are also very fragrant, an ambrosia of delight!  Sweet, almost tropical scents of grape flowers have been wafting through the fields.  Most varieties now have set clusters but the Cabernet is taking its time and looks to be setting a good crop.

The rains this season were late and far apart which made for good vineyard working conditions throughout the winter and early spring, with fields not too wet and muddy.  Frost season was also mild this year, so workers got enough rest to work through the days.  This allowed the vineyard crew to get a head start on cultivation and weed control and to stay on schedule despite extra work on fencing, irrigation and frost systems that needed repair after the fires last fall.  A new frost pump was installed at the Easterbrook vineyard and as summer heats up work is underway to replace destroyed drip and filters.

Until bud break this spring it was hard to tell exactly how many vines had burned last fall.  Now that leaves and shoots are out we finalized our dead-vine count at around 7 acres.  Vines that didn’t die are doing fine with expected vigor and timing.  We will be working on replacing dead vines as the season progresses.

Cover crop in the vineyard

Ground is being prepared for new plantings of Cabernet and Chardonnay at our Road D vineyard.  There are many steps to be completed before the young vines can be put into the ground.  Soil is ripped and disked, then smoothed.  Next, the irrigation system is laid out for both summer watering (to help the young vines) and spring frost protection.  The grid of the vineyard is laid out by hand using cables marked with spacers, then stakes are set.  Wires are installed to hang the drip hose and train the young vines as they reach their established height.  Finally, the watering system is completed and the vines can be planted.  After they are established it will be 3 years before any grapes are harvested.  During their productive life they need much less watering.

Chardonnay for this planting will be grown from cuttings made this winter.  Cuttings are a form of vegetative propagation, a technique used by humankind to cultivate grapes for thousands of years.  While the vines are dormant, healthy wood that grew the previous season is selected and cut to about 18”.  The pieces are chosen based on girth, vigor of the parent plant and bud spacing.  Two buds are left at the tip of each cutting and the rest are removed, which encourages the cutting to root at the bottom. These cuttings are bundled and buried in moist sand.  

These vines will be on their “own roots” as opposed to being grafted onto a rootstock.  Own-rooted vineyards are uncommon due to the risk of damage by pheloxera, a soil-borne louse that can kill grapevines when populations in the soil are out of balance.  We don’t worry about this in our organic soils as we have plenty of healthy soil microbiology that will compete with phyloxera and keep it from causing damage.  We will begin planting soon.  The cuttings were stored in a cool dark place for the last several months and are now pushing roots and shoots, eager to get planted.

As springtime rolls into summertime, we are busy!  We are looking forward to a summer of good ripening weather and a harvest without the challenges of smoky grapes and disruption form natural disasters.  Keep your fingers crossed for us.  Cheers from the crew!

Here are some more photos from Spring, 2018.

Bird in the vineyard
Bird resting on organic Chardonnay vine.

Thermostate used to check risk of frost in the vineyard
Thermometer used during late-night vineyard frost patrol.

Tree in Frey organic vineyard
This oak tree makes a good perch for birds that hunt insects in the vineyards.

Time Posted: Jun 11, 2018 at 3:47 PM
Lisa Batson
 
June 8, 2018 | Lisa Batson

French Lentil Salad with Frey Organic Chardonnay

French lentil salad with Frey Organic Chardonnay

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 large carrots, cut into dime-sized cubes
1 red onion, finely sliced
2 medium sized sweet potatoes, cut into dime-sized cubes
3 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 cup French lentils
2 1/2 cup vegetable broth
Feta cheese, crumbled
Arugula
Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 375ºF.  Put the carrots, onion and sweet potatoes in large shallow baking tray.  Drizzle with 2 tbsp olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast.  Turn occasionally for 30 minutes or until tender and browning. 

Put 1 cup lentils in medium-size pot and add 2½ cups vegetable broth.  Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, until tender or about 35 minutes.  If water level gets low, add water and reduce the cooking temperature. 

Scatter the cooked lentils over a serving platter. Top with the roasted vegetables, crumbled feta and arugula, then drizzle with the balsamic vinegar and the rest of the extra-virgin olive oil.

Enjoy with a glass of Frey Organic Chardonnay!

Katrina Frey
 
May 8, 2018 | Katrina Frey

A Hum in the Air

Honeybee swarm on charred fir tree
Honeybee swarm under a burned Douglas fir tree.

Sunday, April 22nd, was a gorgeous spring day at the Frey Ranch, graced with abundant wildflowers bursting from the scorched earth.  Eliza was jogging along a trail and heard the hum.  She followed it to a huge swarm of bees hanging underneath a burned Douglas fir log. Little Freylings Bo, aged six, and Yeshua, aged five, and Grampa Jonathan were the guardians of the swarm for two hours while Katrina and Carolyn scurried to gather bee suits, a cardboard box with a secure lid with holes punched in for air, and a custom bee brush to softly sweep the swarm into the box. Just as we walked up with our equipment, the swarm decided to move on.  We were so disappointed, but our veteran beekeeper, Carolyn Brown, hoped we would get a second chance.  We followed, jogging between charred trees with craned necks, keeping the swarm in sight, and it soared higher and higher.  Carolyn told the boys, "Old-time beekeepers used to bang on a pot to bring the bees to earth." And voila, a few yards away we found a little cooking pot lying in the burned dirt.  Bo began to rhythmically bang on the pot and within thirty seconds the swarm tightened up and drifted down to earth!  The bees settled on a low oak tree branch and five minutes later we had a healthy new colony to bring home.  The boys were thrilled and we added the magical pot to our box of bee equipment.

If all is going well within a hive in the springtime, the bees find themselves bursting at the seams with overpopulation.  Then the mysterious collective wisdom of the colony signals that it’s time to "give birth" to a second colony.  The worker bees fashion special queen rearing cells and the reigning queen lays eggs in them.  The embryo queens are carefully tended and fed a royal jelly.  Just before the new queens are due to hatch, a powerful agreement between all the bees triggers half of the population to fly out into the world in a great swarm to seek a new home.  The old queen goes with them and is carefully protected in the center of the swarm.  They will land on a tree branch, fence post, or a gnarled Cabernet grapevine (see below), and send out scouts to find a good site.  Bees have only two to three days to find a new home after they leave their mother colony. 

They sometimes settle into less than desirable locations for their new hives.  Statistics show that fewer than twenty-five percent of swarms survive their first year.  If you are a lucky beekeeper, you will have a chance to capture a swarm and provide a secure home for it.

In the coming days we have been blessed with four more swarms of honeybees.  We hope that by housing them in clean, well-made bee boxes, they will thrive.  If nature provides a steady stream of flowering plants, the honey crop in the fall should be abundant enough to feed the bees through the winter, as well as provide some honey for our friends and family.

If it's a light crop, we never extract honey, but instead leave it all for the hard-working bees.

After our new bees are settled in and the queens begin laying again, we plan to move one hive to our new winery site.  Honeybees will play an important role in the pollination cycle of the gardens and native plants that will surround the new winery.  Please come and visit the bees when our new tasting room opens in the fall and discover more about nature's gift of the honeybee.

Several insecticides that are harmful to bees will be banned soon in Europe.  You can help make it happen in the U.S. as well.

Honeybee swarm closeup
Part of a honeybee swarm on an apple tree.

Collecting wile honeybees
Katrina and Carolyn under the gathering swarm.

Honeybee swarm
A swarm in an oak tree.

Honeybee swarm on Cabernet vine
This swarm chose an old Cab vine while scouts looked for a new house site.

Honeybee swarm on Cabernet Sauvignon vine
Hanging in the Cab vine while scouts search for a home.

Eliza collecting wild honeybees
Eliza Frey softly brushes the swarm into a box.


Into the box and later a better hive.

Honeybee swarm in apple tree
A smaller swarm in an apple tree.

 

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