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Frey Organic Wine Blog

Nicole Paisley Martensen
 
March 16, 2019 | Nicole Paisley Martensen

New Winery Construction, March 2019 Update

We are excited to be building our new winery on West Road in Redwood Valley.  Our new site is located amongst vineyards that we have farmed for many years, but we rarely had the opportunity to show off the beauty of the land to visitors.  It is a south-facing parcel that is tucked up against forested benchland and is home to a few majestic valley oaks and a scenic irrigation pond.

We knew that for the design and construction of the building we would need a team leader who was aligned with our vision for an energy-efficient and sustainable space.  Craig Frost of Frostline Systems, based in nearby Willits, was the perfect person to head up the design and build.  Craig has experience in mechanical engineering, architecture, and construction and has been involved in the remodeling of the Cotton Auditorium in Fort Bragg, the construction of Laytonville High School and low-income housing in Mendocino County.

The outer shell of our new winery is a 43,000 sq ft metal building that measures 37 ft tall and supports a roof of solar panels.  This is the first time in our winery’s history that the majority of our wine tanks will be housed indoors, which will allow better humidity and temperature control.  The building will be night-air controlled, pulling in cool air at night, and using the temperature differential between day and night to regulate the inside temperature.  It is the most passive system we could achieve given the size of the space, and with the help of the solar panels, it will be energy self-sufficient over the course of a year.

Pouring cement for new Frey organic winery site.

Wherever we can, we are choosing green materials and creative detailing.  We are using NorCal Concrete recycled concrete blocks for the retaining wall that supports the ramp leading up to the crush pad.  The 380 ft long wall is capped with a decorative bas-relief of iconic shapes and images from our area.  Vineyard truck drivers hauling grapes will start at the bottom and see imprinted grapevines and wildflowers, then forest with mushrooms and bear, then ocean with sea creatures and a surfer.

The tasting room and office floors will be made with recycled maple from the flooring of an old school gym.  The doors will be fashioned from recycled redwood from water tanks.  We have been able to salvage some of the wood from trees lost in the fire, and although it isn’t strong enough for structural lumber, we will be able to integrate it in trim work and decorative pieces.

Tasting room visitors will have the added treat of a self-guided nature trail through beautiful pollinator gardens, up the benchland to survey the vineyards from above, and down along the bio-swale and the pond habitat.

Our construction crew has been phenomenal in providing excellent skills and dedicated labor.  Johnny Frey, our third-generation assistant winemaker, has been Craig’s main assistant with designing and building.  “I often call up Katrina and tell her how amazing her son is,” Craig confesses.  “We work really well together and we’re able to achieve a lot in a short amount of time.”  In addition to Craig and Johnny, we’ve had the pleasure of working with owners of local companies:  Ryan Mayfield of R and M Construction, Josh Smith of Smith Concrete, and Chris Solomon of Solomon Electric.

The wet winter here in Redwood Valley is great for grapevines, but not as easy on construction, so our concrete pours have been delayed.  We are on schedule to have the crush pad ready in time for harvest 2019, and we’re planning on celebrating with a big party.  We’ll keep you updated on our grand opening date, and we can’t wait to share our new space with you!

Building the retaining wall at new Frey organic winery.

Pouring the cement slab at new Frey organic winery site.

Frey Vineyards
 
March 14, 2019 | Frey Vineyards

Wildlife near Frey Organic Vineyards

In 2015 we set up an automatic camera in protected forestland near our organic vineyards to learn more about the local wildlife.  The camera was placed at a spring high up the mountain.  What a surprise it was to discover that so many animals visited to bathe and drink, including bears, foxes, deer, and many species of birds.  The abundance of bears was especially surprising, as the shy and elusive creature is rarely spotted in person.

Another surprise was footage of a fisher (Pekania pennanti), a sleek and cat-like member of the weasel family, widespread in Canada.  A narrow branch of their territory reaches southward to the northern Rocky Mountains, the Cascade Range in Oregon, the High Sierras, and amazingly along the Northern Coast Range of California where Frey Vineyards is located.  It’s a beautiful creature that needs forestland to survive. 

In 2016 we added a second camera at a bear wallow about a half mile from the first camera.  Familiar faces appeared such as one particularly large, tranquil behemoth of a bear, as well as a wary bear always looking over his shoulder.  In the following years we added a couple more cameras, most of which were lost in the great fire that swept through our area in 2017.  The one that survived captured scenes of a slow-moving forest fire, which we’ll post soon.

The wildlife just a short walk from our home and vineyards reminds us about the importance of farming sustainably and organically, without synthetic pesticide drift to contaminate the water and ecosystems that sustain all of us.  We hope you support organic food production by choosing organic when you can.

 

Check out our YouTube channel for the short versions.

 

Time Posted: Mar 14, 2019 at 10:59 AM
Frey Vineyards
 
November 30, 2018 | Frey Vineyards

New Winery Under Construction – Video Update for November 2018

A quick video update on the progress of our new winery.

 

Frey Vineyards
 
December 7, 2015 | Frey Vineyards

The Soil Story Video

We had to share with you "The Soil Story," a great video made from the people at Kiss the Soil.  Learn how regenerative agriculture and farming play an important role in reducing carbon in the atmosphere.

Molly Frey
 
August 20, 2014 | Molly Frey

Horse Power!

Pull horse tilling organic garden

I recently interviewed Julia Dakin, a local horse woman here in Mendocino County, California, about the horse powered work that’s been happening on the Frey farm. A life-long horse enthusiast, Julia got interested in draft horses a few years ago. She wondered if it would be possible for local vineyards to convert to horse power to do the work currently done by tractors. She met up with Luke and Lily Frey, who have been experimenting with draft horse work on the farm for the past several years.

Luke and Lily have been working to develop a rapport with draft horses on the Frey farm. As they built relationships with the horses, they have branched out to harnessing the horses and accomplishing farm tasks and logging with the horses on the land. Julia noted that logging with horses is one of the most environmental ways to do forestry management, as the horses are able to get into more narrow and tight spaces with far less impact than a road and heavy machinery. The horses get to exercise, and the land gets tended more gently. This last spring, Andy, Bonnie and Lola (the horses), accompanied by Luke, Lily and Julia (the humans), pulled logs out of the forest, tilled the garden beds on the ranch’s biodynamic farm, and tested various implements in the vineyard. 

Horse pulls logs

Forestry horse

From experiences with the horses, Julia took her research a step farther and enrolled in online classes by Elaine Ingham in soil science. Her studies led her to the field of no-till agriculture. As she’s been delving into the world of soil, she’s been postulating that horses might be able to create a niche for vineyard management, by practicing no-till methods with a roller-crimper tool that is hitched to the horses.  Instead of tilling up the soil with a disc, which disturbs the soil life (worms, bacteria, fungi), the roller-crimper moves between the vineyard rows to smash down the cover crop.

Pull horse

If Julia’s work with the horses is successful, they may have a more efficient system of converting cover crops into soil fertility. Also, using the roller-crimper helps sequester carbon in the land, while protecting and nourishing the layers of soil ecology already in place. Julia also hopes to find through current research on test plots, that the soil being worked with the roller-crimper both enriches the land and could prove to be a cost-effective enterprise for local grape farmers, whether or not they use horses. Julia currently has horses that she’s working with to amass some data to look at the roller-crimper horse-power at different sites. Should her efforts prove qualitatively impressive, Julia would like to expand the ways that local vineyards become carbon sinks instead of a carbon source, by transitioning to more horse-powered tasks: seeding cover crops, mowing, roller-crimper, and perhaps harvesting.

Luke applying preps

Additionally, as part of the biodynamics program on the farm, we prepare a unique blend of organic, homeopathic herbal sprays that we apply to the crops to nurture soil fertility. At present, Julia and Luke have been having some horse-powered spraying sessions to see how the horses fare as the deliver mechanism for these potent land medicines.

There are several factors to weigh in about how and if a farm would convert to a horse-powered technology. Julia is quick to note that with the prevalence of cheap oil and the speed of mechanical inventions, horses have been relegated to a technology of the past.  However, with the use of more innovative techniques, like no-till, horses may well prove themselves to be able to compete with mechanized technologyfor the lesser impact they have on the carbon footprint of the land and for the potentially important contribution to increased soil fertility.

For more information on Julia’s research with the horses, follow her blog at www.rganicnotill.com.

Click here for a YouTube video clip.

Setting up the plow

Frey Vineyards
 
January 30, 2013 | Frey Vineyards

New Release: Frey Biodynamic Field Blend

Frey Vineyards 2011 Field Blend was crafted specifically for Whole Foods customers.  Our goal with Field Blend was to produce a Biodynamic® example of terroir at its finest expression, where soil, varietal character, and vintage culminate in an authentic representation of our vineyards.

Frey Biodynamic Field Blend bottleField Blend is graced with a subtle nose of red currant, a hint of star anise, iron, and rose hips.  The flavors lend themselves to an available freshness showing dewberry, white pepper, red beet, and a touch of licorice.  The finish is balanced with apricot, kola nut, and cherry bark.  While 2011 presented a challenging growing season for much of Northern California, it also prompted us to take a creative approach with some unconventional blends.  For Field Blend, we took the best of our estate-grown grapes, starting with our Syrah for composed structure, melding it with our Zinfandel for added spice, and rounding everything out with our soft, plummy Merlot.  Field Blend pairs harmoniously with grilled flank steak with olive sauce, paella with spicy sausage, or penne with porcini mushrooms.

The Field Blend label was designed by our wine club director, Nicole Paisley Martensen.  It incorporates a collage of vintage astrological charts and farmers’ almanacs, evoking the origins of Biodynamic farming and its founder, Rudolf Steiner, along with photographs of grapevines and tractor treads at Frey Vineyards.

Time Posted: Jan 30, 2013 at 2:07 PM
Molly Frey
 
January 27, 2013 | Molly Frey

Giving wild honeybees a chance

Surrounding our estate organic and biodynamic vineyards are woodlands and forests that harbor wildlife and sustain local biodiversity, including the wild honeybee. This vital pollinating insect is suffering worldwide from colony collapse disorder, widely believed due to it's extreme sensitivity to modern pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, that weaken their immune system. So last year when we spotted a hive in need of help right at the edge of our Petite Sirah vineyard, we quickly gave them a hand.


The hive was located inside this fallen fir tree.

The bees had their home high up in a fir tree, inside the rotted and hollow interior. A windstorm snapped the tree halfway up and the hive fell. Much of it shattered on impact with crushed honeycombs seeping across the splintered trunk. We were tempted to eat some of the honey, but this food was vital to the bees if they were to survive the rest of the winter, so it was hands off the sweet ambrosia. Luke Frey quickly brought an empty beehive box and put the surviving humming mass of bees in it along with every drop of their precious honey. Then he placed it on top of the fallen tree right next to the old hive.


Here's a short video with some live footage of these beautiful wild honeybees.

It was soon apparent the queen did not survive the fall so a frame with two capped queen cells were put in. We crossed our fingers that the orphaned honeybees would take to their new home and raise a new queen. A few weeks later they were still there! Following the coronation the hive raised a new brood into the spring and summer. But then they were gone! We suspect that they swarmed and made a new hive in an old wine barrel by our Merlot vineyard. It's also possible the colony perished.


Wild honeybees and their shattered, exposed hive.


The location of the honeybee's new hive is circled, next to the Frey Biodynamic Petite Sirah vineyard.

Frey Vineyards
 
December 12, 2011 | Frey Vineyards

Learn in 3 minutes how to pair Frey Organic Wine with fine cheeses!

Barrie Lynn at the Cheese Impresario has some great tips to share with you on pairing your favorite Frey wine with fine specialty cheeses.  She pairs Frey Organic Chardonnay with mouthwatering Gruyère, Frey Organic Sauvignon Blanc with some creamy goat cheese, and Frey Organic Cab with aged cheddar.  Try one of the combinations at your next holiday party!  The videos can be found here on YouTube.

Cheese Empresario

Katrina Frey
 
February 26, 2010 | Katrina Frey

An Interview with Katrina & Jonathan Frey, by GIAIM

Check out this interview with Katrina & Jonathan Frey of Frey Organic Wines, produced by the great people at GIAIM – Healthy Green Living. The interview was recorded a few years ago.

 

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