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Frey Vineyards

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Frey Organic Wine Blog

Tamara Frey
 
November 13, 2014 | Tamara Frey

Wild Mushroom Soup with Roasted Red Pepper Purée

Our in-house chef Tamara Frey especially created this soup for our Organic Wine Club members.  Copyrighted 2014, Tamara Frey

Mushroom Soup

The pumpkins are gathered and the vines and oak trees are turning orange here at Frey Vineyards.  In the nearby forests mushrooms are popping up!  So I had to do a mushroom soup to welcome the new season.  This soup has the earthy essence of mushrooms, potatoes, and Frey Biodynamic Syrah.  It’s topped with a squirt of Roasted Red Pepper Jalapeno Purée, a Pumpkin Seed Spinach Purée (created by family-friend Julie St. Pierre), and a mini-raft of goat brie set adrift.  I am heavy handed on the garlic and herbs, which is what I like.  You can experiment to your taste.  I love the smells that permeate the house as the Syrah reduces with the dried mushrooms!  Enjoy this rich soup, the very essence of wild mushrooms and organic wine.

Serves 10

1 oz. dried porcini
1 oz. dried mushroom medley
1 bottle Frey Biodynamic Syrah
1/2 pound unsalted butter
3 large leeks
1 large bulb garlic
4 tablespoons fresh thyme (or 2 tablespoons dried)
2 tablespoons dried tarragon (or fresh)
1 tablespoons fresh grated nutmeg
1 pound shitake mushrooms
1 pound white mushrooms
1 pound cremini mushrooms
4 1/2 cups heavy cream
4 cups vegetable stock (or water)
1 tablespoon salt (or add to taste)
1 teaspoon black pepper
1.5 pounds red fingerling potatoes
1 pound yams (Japanese yams or sweet potatoes)
A sprinkle of fresh lemon juice
A sprinkle cayenne

In a saucepan combine the Syrah and the dried mushrooms. Bring to a boil and simmer for a half hour.

Wash and chop coarsely the leeks. Peel the garlic and chop coarsely.  Meanwhile, melt the unsalted butter in a large saucepan. Add the leeks and garlic.  Sweat a few minutes and add the thyme, tarragon, nutmeg and fresh mushrooms.  Throw the mushrooms in whole.  Sauté ten minutes, then add the wine and dried mushroom mixture.  Cover and simmer until mushrooms are soft.  Blend in a Cuisinart or Vita Mix along with the cream and stock.  Pour the purée back into the cooking pot and add the chopped yams or sweet potatoes.  Simmer until potatoes are soft.  Season with salt, pepper, lemon juice and cayenne to taste.

Garnish with:
Goat Brie, Roasted Red Pepper Jalapeno Sauce and Pumpkin Seed Spinach Sauce

Roasted Red Pepper Jalapeno Purée:
2 large red peppers
4 large jalapenos
1 large clove garlic
salt to taste
Roast the pepper and jalapenos on a flame, on stove top (or chop them and grill them with a little butter).  When blackened, let cool down a little.  Rinse under running water while removing seeds. Blend in Cuisinart or Vita Mix with the garlic clove.
Place in bowl, add salt to taste. Set aside.

Pumpkin Seed Spinach Purée:
1/3 cup raw pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup packed spinach leaves
2 cloves garlic
1/4 cup olive oil, extra virgin
1/4 cup water, or until desired consistency
Salt to taste
Blend all above ingredients in Cuisinart or Vita Mix.  If it’s too thick, add water

For each bowl of soup served, pour on tablespoon each of these red and green purées with artistic flair!  Don’t forget a thin slice of goat brie cheese on each bowl as well.

Copyrighted 2014, Tamara Frey

Eliza Frey
 
October 24, 2014 | Eliza Frey

Vineyard Report, Fall 2014

Harvesting organic cabernet wine grapes.
Harvesting Frey Organic & Biodynamic Estate Cabernet Sauvignon.

Due to a warm spring and hot dry summer conditions, the 2014 harvest started 2 weeks ahead of average.  The first three weeks were very busy because all of the white varietals got ripe at the same time.  September and early October were hot, and all berries reached optimal sugar levels ahead of other years, so clusters were allowed to hang and reach physiological ripeness, with nutty seeds, non-bitter skins and gentle tannins.  We got some much-needed rain during harvest, but it wasn’t enough to alleviate drought conditions or damage fruit.  Across the board, the quality was exceptional and yields were near average.

Organic cabernet wine grapes at weigh station.
Vineyard Manager Derek Dahlen at the weigh station.

Frey Vineyards is now farming a new ranch here in Redwood Valley!  The Walt Ranch is planted with Chardonnay, Zinfandel, Cabernet and Petite Sirah grapes and was managed organically by veteran grape grower Tony Milani for the past 25 years.  Tony passed away in March and we look forward to carrying on his tradition of organic grape farming on this beautiful land.

Rescueing piliated woodpecker.
Adam Frey rescues a Pileated Woodpecker.

This year we had visits from several wildlife friends: deer, fox, turkeys and woodpeckers, who live in the adjacent forests and venture out night and day to feast on grapes.  We have a mama bear and 2 cubs visiting our apple and fig trees, nightly.  Adam Frey rescued a wounded Pileated woodpecker at Road D Ranch and nursed it back to health. Although they eat valuable fruit, we are happy to be surrounded by forests that provide habitat for healthy populations of wild animals, no matter their occasional nibbling!

Moving into November, cover crop seeding, Biodynamic horn manure spraying and compost spreading are nearly completed for the season.  We are getting some nice rains this week to enliven the soil for the horn manure and ensure good germination of the cover crops.  The grape leaves are turning to fall colors and the vines are headed for dormancy for the winter.  The vineyards and their keepers are looking forward to a lull until pruning begins after the winter solstice.  In the meantime, we are praying for more rain. Please join us in that endeavor!

We look forward to sharing an excellent 2014 vintage with you soon. Cheers!

Picking organic grapes.
Harvest 2014 is over!

Frey Vineyards
 
October 23, 2014 | Frey Vineyards

Tasting Notes From Éva-Marie Lind

Éva-Marie Lind, parfumeur and CEO/founder of EM Studios Arome in Portland, Oregon, provides us with her next installment of tasting notes for Frey organic and Biodynamic wines. EM Studios Arome specializes in aromatic and olfactory artistry, with a concentration on whole earth ingredients, sensory attunement, and botanical beauty. We love how Éva-Marie’s poetic descriptions take us out of the ordinary Wine Tasting 101 textbook and into a fecund and ethereal world.

Éva-Marie Lind
Eva-Marie Lind

2013 Organic Sauvignon Blanc
Sheer delight met my nose as cherries, vanilla and the inference of the sweet, honeyed 2-penylethyl acetate found in freesia danced forward. In the mouth, a symphony of tropical fruit, the blush of apricot feathered with bergamot, and the fragrance of blackberry flowers where they join at the vine. She unfolds as a mountain creek tumbling over rock, opening into deeper and brighter clarity that is held fast to the zest of Sicilian lemon embellished with the slight tang of star fruit.

2013 Organic Chardonnay
Near luminescent in her aroma, she blossoms into hints of pale early spring tulip petals and the inner breath of white lotus, kissed by moon glow, just before dawn. This one jumps forward with a lovely clarity, yet she is surprisingly voluptuous in the mouth where a momentary splash of pink grapefruit announces the structured waltz of d’anjou pear with the inner blushed heart of a pink lady apple, delicately hugged by a butterscotch cape and offering a lovely crisp, well-lingering finish.

2013 Organic Pinot Noir
Meeting my nose appealingly soft with a subtle floral heart sidling to a blush of blueberries and a whisper of balsam fir and clean earth. What appears more simple and straight forward, begins to triumph in the mouth as her elegantly crisp, drier bouquet opens into a more pronounced impression of golden osmanthus blooms and a layering of fruity leather, a touch of tabac, a sheathing of black licorice, and a smooth velour finish.

2013 Biodynamic® Merlot
The delightful surprise of slight toffee malt and new bud spruce meets your nose, with an inference of tamarind, greeting a blushing orchestration of dark berries on the vine. In the mouth, plush and full-bodied, expressing a marion berry compote, teased by the outer shell notes of pink pepper playing tag at the edges, holding hands with the sheerest inference of the sweetened dry-down notes of saffron. Tannins fill the mouth, drawing all these chords together into a brilliant subtlety, as when standing at the center of an orchard at nightfall when sunset blushes upon warm fruit and exhausted air settles into a harmonious center.

Molly Frey
 
August 20, 2014 | Molly Frey

Horse Power!

Pull horse tilling organic garden

I recently interviewed Julia Dakin, a local horse woman here in Mendocino County, California, about the horse powered work that’s been happening on the Frey farm. A life-long horse enthusiast, Julia got interested in draft horses a few years ago. She wondered if it would be possible for local vineyards to convert to horse power to do the work currently done by tractors. She met up with Luke and Lily Frey, who have been experimenting with draft horse work on the farm for the past several years.

Luke and Lily have been working to develop a rapport with draft horses on the Frey farm. As they built relationships with the horses, they have branched out to harnessing the horses and accomplishing farm tasks and logging with the horses on the land. Julia noted that logging with horses is one of the most environmental ways to do forestry management, as the horses are able to get into more narrow and tight spaces with far less impact than a road and heavy machinery. The horses get to exercise, and the land gets tended more gently. This last spring, Andy, Bonnie and Lola (the horses), accompanied by Luke, Lily and Julia (the humans), pulled logs out of the forest, tilled the garden beds on the ranch’s biodynamic farm, and tested various implements in the vineyard. 

Horse pulls logs

Forestry horse

From experiences with the horses, Julia took her research a step farther and enrolled in online classes by Elaine Ingham in soil science. Her studies led her to the field of no-till agriculture. As she’s been delving into the world of soil, she’s been postulating that horses might be able to create a niche for vineyard management, by practicing no-till methods with a roller-crimper tool that is hitched to the horses.  Instead of tilling up the soil with a disc, which disturbs the soil life (worms, bacteria, fungi), the roller-crimper moves between the vineyard rows to smash down the cover crop.

Pull horse

If Julia’s work with the horses is successful, they may have a more efficient system of converting cover crops into soil fertility. Also, using the roller-crimper helps sequester carbon in the land, while protecting and nourishing the layers of soil ecology already in place. Julia also hopes to find through current research on test plots, that the soil being worked with the roller-crimper both enriches the land and could prove to be a cost-effective enterprise for local grape farmers, whether or not they use horses. Julia currently has horses that she’s working with to amass some data to look at the roller-crimper horse-power at different sites. Should her efforts prove qualitatively impressive, Julia would like to expand the ways that local vineyards become carbon sinks instead of a carbon source, by transitioning to more horse-powered tasks: seeding cover crops, mowing, roller-crimper, and perhaps harvesting.

Luke applying preps

Additionally, as part of the biodynamics program on the farm, we prepare a unique blend of organic, homeopathic herbal sprays that we apply to the crops to nurture soil fertility. At present, Julia and Luke have been having some horse-powered spraying sessions to see how the horses fare as the deliver mechanism for these potent land medicines.

There are several factors to weigh in about how and if a farm would convert to a horse-powered technology. Julia is quick to note that with the prevalence of cheap oil and the speed of mechanical inventions, horses have been relegated to a technology of the past.  However, with the use of more innovative techniques, like no-till, horses may well prove themselves to be able to compete with mechanized technologyfor the lesser impact they have on the carbon footprint of the land and for the potentially important contribution to increased soil fertility.

For more information on Julia’s research with the horses, follow her blog at www.rganicnotill.com.

Click here for a YouTube video clip.

Setting up the plow

Derek Dahlen
 
April 10, 2014 | Derek Dahlen

Spring 2014 Vineyard Update – Thankful for Rain

There has been a lot of talk about drought this year in California, and two months ago we were in the middle of one of the driest winters on record.  Thankfully, since the beginning of February we have seen nearly 30 inches of rainfall in Mendocino County.  Lake Mendocino, which provides water locally and for heavier populated Sonoma County downstream is finally filling up.  Now, looking around, all of our ponds are overflowing, the hillsides are radiating brilliant shades of green, and the grapevines are awakening from their winter dormancy by sprouting fresh shoots.

Budding Syrah vine
Organic Syrah budding out, Frey Vineyards.
 
While grapes can survive in extremely dry climates, water is crucial to grape growing in areas of California like ours for frost protection.  While the vines are breaking bud and the tender new growth that will become the fruiting wood for the season is emerging, we often experience killing freezes that can jeopardize the fruit and decimate a vine’s ability to produce to its full potential.  To avoid frost damage grape growers use overhead sprinklers.  When the nighttime temperatures approach freezing we turn on sprinklers which keep the temperature at 32 degrees and prevent damage to young shoots and leaves.  We are still expecting to see some spring frosts, but so far nothing of consequence.  This is good for two reasons: it allows us to save our precious water for irrigation during the dry months and it allows grape farmers to get some sleep instead of prowling the vineyards checking thermometers in the wee hours of freezing nights.

The month of April is quite often rampant with the anxieties of spring fever, and this year is no exception.  We are wrapping up our vine pruning and tying work.  Pruning is very important because it allows a farmer to control crop load, which directly affects quality.  We are also moving full speed ahead with our mowing and cultivating operations.  The grape prunings are chopped with a shredder and incorporated back into the soil.  Disking in between vine rows incorporates organic matter from cover crops and also locks moisture in the soils by breaking capillary action that allows evaporation through the ground.

Long-range forecasts are calling for a hot and dry summer.  During hot summers with temperatures over 100 degrees, Mendocino County enjoys temperature swings of up to 50 degree between day and night.  This provides the setting for excellent fruit quality because the daytime heat leads to good sugar development and the cool nights keep the acid high, yielding rich and balanced fruit. Although there are still at least five months until we begin harvest, with quite a few variables to consider, I am beginning to believe that this year is going to be a top-notch vintage!

Springtime in organic vineyard.
Spring chickens (and a duck) in organic Syrah Vineyard.

Time Posted: Apr 10, 2014 at 4:14 PM
Frey Vineyards
 
April 9, 2014 | Frey Vineyards

Introducing Frey Organic Agriculturist Blanc

We created Organic Agriculturist Blanc exclusively for Whole Foods customers nationwide, later to be available everywhere. It comprises a delicious blend of Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and Riesling grapes.  Blended as a counterpart to the original Frey Organic Agriculturist red wine, the Blanc follows suit as a food-friendly and versatile white.  

Fermentation in stainless steel and minimal manipulation in the cellar keep the flavors crisp and clean.  Aromas of honeysuckle lead the way to refreshing tropical fruit flavors, nuanced by starfruit and lychee.  Lush Chardonnay forms the body of the blend and Sauvignon Blanc delivers a hint of sweetgrass.  A whisper of 5% Riesling provides a delicate touch of citrus-honey on the finish.  Like the floral wreath engraving on the label, the Organic Agriculturist Blanc is the epitome of summer’s bounty waiting to burst forth.

Pairs well with grilled fish topped with peach salsa, or Vietnamese lettuce wraps with a sweet chili dipping sauce.

The label features Lily & Rosie Frey at work in the vineyard.  The "A Day in the Life..." column reminds us that we know how to intersperse the hard work with good times here at Frey Ranch.  The QR code leads to our upcoming video about young organic farmers and our commitment to caring for the earth for future generations.

Look for Organic Agriculturist Blanc at your local Whole Foods market later this spring!

Frey Vineyards
 
April 8, 2014 | Frey Vineyards

3rd Annual Earth Day Biodynamic Farm Tour and Dinner

Join us Saturday, April 12, from 3:00-8:00 pm at Frey Vineyards to celebrate our 3rd Annual Earth Day Biodynamic Farm Tour and Dinner.

Guided farm tours begin at 3:00 pm with a short hike to the barn to visit our farm animals and the bountiful Biodynamic veggie, flower and herb gardens. We'll stroll through the vineyards and olive orchard with a stop off for hors d'oeuvres and wine at the tower. A hay ride brings us back to the winery to celebrate the day with a festive dinner served at 6:00pm in our cellar tasting room. The dinner menu is prepared with seasonal organic ingredients from the Frey Ranch, paired with award-winning Frey organic and Biodynamic wines.

We'll be hosting the tour rain or shine, but we do recommend that you bring boots and an umbrella in case of rain.

Cost for the Farm Tour and Dinner is $45 per person, $30 for Frey Organic Wine Club members. Just the Farm Tour portion of this event is free for Wine Club members and children under 12.

Please call 800.760.3739 or email us (wineclub@freywine.com) for more information or to RSVP.

Lily Frey
 
April 7, 2014 | Lily Frey

Lily's Stuffed Mushrooms

A tasty recipe from Lily Frey, who likes to make these appetizers for a crowd.  We’ll be enjoying these at our Earth Day Biodynamic Farm Tour & Dinner!

stuffed mushrooms

Ingredients:
20 brown or white button mushrooms
½ lb sausage, removed from casings or uncased (Vegetarian option: Add ¾ c. cooked wild rice or bread crumbs and extra onion and greens)
5 cloves garlic, minced
½ large onion, or 1 small onion, chopped fine
2 tbsp. minced fresh sage
¼ c. Frey Organic white wine
1 c. finely chopped greens (nettles, chard, kale etc.)
½ c. cooked wild rice
8 oz. cream cheese, at room temp.
1 egg yolk
¾ c. grated Parmesan cheese
2 tbsp. garlic butter (or 2 tbsp. melted butter with a clove of crushed garlic)
Salt & pepper to taste

Preparation:
1) Wash mushrooms and pop out stems. Chop the stems finely and set aside.   
2) Brown and crumble sausage in a pan. Set aside to cool.   
3) Using the same pan, sauté the onions, garlic and sage for 3 min. Add wine, then let it cook off. Add mushroom stems, then the greens, and let cook another 3 min. or until onions are translucent and greens are done. Add salt and pepper to taste. Set aside to cool.   
4) Sauté mushroom tops in garlic butter with salt 4-5 minutes each side or until mushrooms are soft and partly cooked.  Set aside and let cool.  
5) In a bowl, combine cream cheese and egg yolk. Add cooled sausage, onions, mushroom stems, rice, parsley and ¾ C of the grated cheese.   
6) Butter or oil a pan around 9 by 14 inches in size.   
7) Heap each mushroom with stuffing and place in pan. Extra stuffing can go around mushrooms or refrigerated for later use.   
8) Sprinkle remainder of grated cheese over the tops and bake at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.

Share and enjoy with a chilled glass of Frey Biodynamic Chardonnay!

Copyrighted 2014, Lily Frey

Eliza Frey
 
March 25, 2014 | Eliza Frey

Sustainable Labels

Forest Stewardship Council release:
“The Forest Stewardship Council mission is to promote environmentally sound, socially beneficial and economically prosperous management of the world's forests.

Our vision is that we can meet our current needs for forest products without compromising the health of the world’s forests for future generations.”

 At Frey Vineyards we strive to green every step of our winemaking, from the vineyard to the cellar, and finally to the wine label itself.  This year we made the switch to using Forest Stewardship Council Certified paper.  We are excited to join forces with the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).  This step is a natural progression in the development of the most environmentally friendly winemaking possible.

In order to include the logo on our labels, the paper must pass through the FSC chain of custody, which ensures sound environmental practices from the forest to the paper manufacturer, the merchant, and finally to a print shop with FSC Chain of Custody Certification.  We now have confidence that our label purchasing is supporting an independent, third party movement making real strides towards preserving forestland in the US and abroad.

People all over the world depend on forests to live.  Worldwide 1.6 billion people depend on forests for their primary livelihood.  Forests filter water and air and the fungal communities in forests support all life on the planet.  They are also a crucial refuge for countless plant and animal species.  Deforestation is noted as the second leading cause of carbon pollution, and causes an estimated 20% of total global greenhouse gas emissions.

In the US most forestland is privately owned and managed.  With more than 40,000 family owned member forests, FSC works to create demand for products sourced from responsibly managed forests.  Being a member of FSC provides incentives for these families to keep the forests and harvest them sustainably, and not to clear-cut for development or farming.

The Forest Stewardship Council was founded in Canada in 1993 and is dedicated to improving forest practices across the world.  The Council formed in response to the lack of an agreement to stop deforestation at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio De Jaineiro. Boycotts of forest products had proven to be ineffective in protecting these vital ecosystems because they lead to devaluation of productive forestland.  FSC started as a collaborative project by independent businesses and organizations.  They created a chain of custody process and a logo, which have proven to be successful at encouraging responsible choices by consumers.  The organization now operates in 80 countries and thousands of businesses and organizations are turning to FSC to help make responsible choices for the purchasing of forest products ranging from lumber to papers.

Apart from their work with paper, FSC has had a big impact on the manufacturing of green building.  Green building represents the strongest sector of the construction industry.  In 2012 an estimated 25% of all commercial and 20% of residential construction starts were in the category.  FSC features over 1,000 Chain of Custody building products with more emerging each year.

We want to thank FSC staff and members for their dedication and innovation in supporting responsible forestry!  We are proud to be a part of this growing movement.

Tamara Frey
 
December 4, 2013 | Tamara Frey

Challah Bread

This traditional Jewish recipe has been enjoyed by our family since the early 1970’s when a dear friend of ours introduced it to us. It was a version of the sacred bread used for the Jewish Sabbath, and passed down from her family. We have always enjoyed this special bread at weddings, Thanksgiving and Christmas, and would like to pass it on to you.

Fresh challah bread
Fresh Challah Bread.

Makes two large loaves

8 cups bread flour
2 teaspoons salt
2 tbsp. dry yeast
3 ½ cups milk
4 tbsp. honey
6 tbsp. unsalted butter
4 eggs
1 cup walnuts (optional)
5 more cups of flour

In a large bowl, stir together 4 cups of the flour with the salt and dry yeast. Save the remaining 4 cups of flour for later.

Next, place a sauce pan on low heat and mash up the butter, milk and honey. You can use a large fork or a whisk to do the mashing and mixing. Don’t let it get too hot or it will kill the yeast.  When butter is melted and mixed with the milk and honey, remove from heat and add to the dry ingredients. Beat with a whisk until well mixed. This mixture is called a sponge. Cover with a damp cloth. Then place the sponge in a warm draft-free area for 15 minutes to let the yeast activate.

With the mixture still in the bowl, whisk in 3 eggs (as well as the optional 1 cup of walnuts.) Slowly add the remaining flour one cup at a time for the first 3 cups.  Beat well with a wooden spoon after each addition.  As the dough develops it will slowly come away from the sides of the bowl and become less sticky.  At this point take the dough out and put it on a floured surface to start the kneading.  Keep adding the flour in small increments until the Challah dough is smooth, elastic, and forms a ball.  Knead the ball of dough for about 10 minutes more to develop the gluten. This is a great upper-body strengthening exercise!

I was taught that when you pull the dough apart, if it stretch’s thin, and does not break, it’s ready.  (If you used whole wheat dough it will not be as elastic.)

Now, let’s let it rise. Dust a large bowl with flour, or smear with softened butter. Put in the dough and cover with a damp cloth and let sit in a warm place for approx. 45 minutes.  A warm oven works well in cold weather. Let the dough rise until it doubles in bulk.  (When using whole wheat flour, it rises and softens, but does not double in size.)  Punch the dough down back to size, put it back on a board, and knead into a ball. Divide dough in half.  Then divide each half into three. Roll each of the 6 pieces of dough into a long, thin strand. Braid three strands at a time, forming 2 loaves. Place braided dough on a cookie sheet in a warm area and let them rise. After they rise and are soft to the touch, beat an egg in a small bowl and very, very gently brush the egg wash onto the loaves using a pastry brush.  Sprinkle with poppy seeds.  (The risen dough is a bit fragile at this stage when ready to go in the oven.  Don’t jostle it.  If it deflates, knead it again and let it rise again.)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place the two breads in oven and bake for approx. 35 to 40 minutes, or until Challah is golden brown and sounds hollow when knocked gently with your knuckles.

It’s superb when served with sweet butter!

Challah dough
Challah dough made with whole wheat and added wallnuts.

(Recipe & images copyrighted © Tamara Frey, 2013. All right reserved.)