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Frey Vineyards

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Frey Organic Wine Blog

Tamara Frey
 
December 7, 2011 | Tamara Frey

Holiday Fruitcake with Bitter Chocolate Sauce

This recipe for a classic holiday fruitcake is lightly sweetened with real honey and the fruit is soaked and simmered in Frey Organic Dessertage Port. It's easy to make and certainly will disappear quickly at your holiday party! I use organic ingredients whenever possible, to help organic farmers and the planet.

Holiday fruit cake slathered in chocolate
Holiday Fruitcake with Bitter Chocolate Sauce, made by Chef Tamara Frey.

Recipe makes one cake.

1 cup thinly sliced dried apricots. (organic Turkish apricots are usually not too dry and perfect for this)
1 cup thinly sliced dried figs
1 cup Frey Organic Dessertage Port (Mendocino dessert wine)

1 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature (vegan alternative: coconut butter)
1 cup honey
4 eggs (vegan alternative: an egg-replacer found at health food stores)
1 tablespoon vanilla

3 cups whole spelt flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon nutmeg (fresh ground nutmeg is best by using whole nutmegs and rough-grating them on a cheese grater)
1 cup dried cranberries
1 cup chopped almonds
1 cup chopped walnuts
For the Bitter Chocolate Sauce and garnish:
¾ cup heavy cream (vegan alternative: just leave out the cream and simply melt the chocolate as-as; it will only leave the cooled chocolate on the brittle side)
1½ cups chopped bittersweet chocolate
½ to 1 cup chopped macadamia nuts

Preheat oven to 300F and generously butter an angel food cake pan (vegan alternative: coconut oil).

In small saucepan, combine the apricots, figs, and Frey Organic Dessertage sweet wine.  Simmer until wine is almost boiled off, which takes 10 to 15 minutes.  Set aside to cool.  In large bowl beat the butter with electric beater until creamy.  Add honey and beat until blended.  Add eggs (or vegan egg-replacer) one at a time, and beat well after each addition.  Add vanilla and mix that in.  Set aside.

In a large bowl mix together the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cranberries, almonds, and walnuts.  Then gently mix in the apricots and figs by folding. Spoon it all into the buttered (or oiled) angel food cake pan.  Bake approx. 50 minutes or until a knife inserted into center comes out clean.  Let it sit 15 minutes, then extract it out of its mold onto a cooling rack.  While it cools, bring the cream to a simmer (for vegans, skip to the next step).  Add the chopped chocolate.  Let melt a few minutes.  Stir, then let it cool but not so much that it cannot pour out.  Place the cake on serving platter, pour over the chocolate sauce, then garnish with the chopped macadamia nuts.  Surround with pine boughs or other seasonal decorative.

Holiday fruit cake slice
A slice of Holiday Fruitcake!

(Recipe copyrighted © Tamara Frey, 2011. All right reserved)

Tamara Frey
 
December 1, 2011 | Tamara Frey

Glazed Pumpkin with Maple Walnuts

In front of the Frey Vineyards winery this fall were several pumpkins lined up in a row upon which the oak trees settled their orange-hued leaves.  The pumpkins were just harvested from the vineyard gardens and that scene inspired this tasty Thanksgiving side dish.

Roasted Pumpkin Walnut Dish
Glazed Pumpkin with Maple Walnuts, by Chef Tamara Frey.

Pumpkins are usually used for pies in the U.S.  But the humble pumpkin is a winter squash after all and certainly can be prepared as such.  So after some experimentation I came up with this dish in which the texture and taste of this famed North American squash is newly revealed in sweet & spicy tenderness.  Serve it as a side dish with your next Thanksgiving dinner!

Serves 6 to 8

There are 2 steps for preparing the pumpkin.  It’s first cooked in an oven, then glazed in a sauté pan.  For vegans, coconut oil may be used instead of butter.

For the Pumpkin in the Oven:
1 medium pie pumpkin of about 4 lbs.
½ cup Frey Gewurztraminer
6 whole cardamom pods
2 cinnamon sticks
2 tablespoons maple syrup
2 tablespoons unsalted butter or coconut oil
  
For the Pumpkin in the Sauté Pan:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter or coconut oil
½ cup Frey Gewurztraminer
2 tablespoons maple syrup
salt and pepper to taste

For the Maple Walnut Garnish:
1 cup walnut pieces (do not chop)
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 teaspoon cinnamon

Pumpkin in the Oven
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Cut the pumpkin in half and scoop out the seeds.  Lay the pumpkin halves face down on a cutting board.  Cut off the skin with a knife, slicing downward and rotating as needed.  Cut up the skinned pumpkin halves to ½ inch chunks.  Spread out the chunks onto a baking dish.  Toss on the cinnamon sticks.  Before sprinkling on the cardamom, first crush the pods using a knife held flat against a cutting board.  Now drizzle on the ½ cup Frey Gewurztraminer.  Add the maple syrup and the unsalted butter or coconut oil.  Mix the ingredients together a bit and spread out across the baking dish.  Bake in the preheated oven for about 40 minutes.  Stir about every 15 minutes.  Pumpkin chunks will be al dente.

Walnut Garnish
While the pumpkin is baking, toast the maple walnuts for the garnish.  In a smaller baking dish throw in the non-chopped walnut pieces and add the maple syrup and cinnamon.  Mix them up well so the walnuts get a real soaking from the syrup.  Then spread it all out on a baking dish and toast in 350 degree oven for 10 minutes.  Set it aside.  It will be used as the garnish in the final step!

Pumpkin in the Sauté Pan
Fresh from the oven now, throw in the baked pumpkin chunks into a sauté pan of medium-high heat along with 2 of the 4 tablespoons unsalted butter or coconut oil (you’ll be adding the other 2 tablespoons shortly).Pour in the Gewurztraminer and maple syrup, and salt and pepper to taste.  Stir and cook down a minute, then add the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter or coconut oil.  Swirl and stir till melted and incorporated into the sauce.  Then put the glazed pumpkin into your favorite serving bowl.  Garnish with the Maple Walnuts spread over the top.  Be sure to arrange the cinnamon sticks with an aesthetic and personalized touch!

Pumpkin dish closeup
A cinnamon stick ads the final touch!

(Recipe copyrighted © Tamara Frey, 2011. All right reserved)

Tamara Frey
 
October 3, 2011 | Tamara Frey

Angel Pasta with Salmon

Angel Pasta with Salmon close up
Angel Pasta with Salmon, by Chef Tamara Frey.

I’ve always loved salmon with a glass of Syrah, so I came up with this dish especially to enjoy with one of my favorite wines.

Angel Pasta with Salmon
Feeds 4 to 6.

4 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 small red onions, peeled, halved and sliced thin
2  cups thinly sliced crimini mushrooms
1 cup yellow squash cut into matchstick sized pieces (julienne cut)
2 tablespoons fresh slivered garlic (cut garlic cloves very thin)
½ pound salmon steak, cut into ½ inch cubes
4 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
4 tablespoons chopped chives
1 teaspoon whole mixed peppercorns
10 cherry tomatoes
½ to cup Frey Biodynamic Syrah
1 cup heavy cream
8 tablespoons fresh grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Melt butter in saucepan.  Add the onions, mushrooms and squash.  Sauté a minute or so, then add the garlic, peppercorns, salmon pieces, and half the herbs (save other half for garnish).  Sauté a minute or so more, until done.  Add the Syrah, cook it down until bubbly and thickened a bit.  Then add the cream and let it cook until desired thickness.  Season with salt to taste.

For the Angel Hair pasta: Cook ¾ pound of Angel Hair or Capellini pasta, following directions on package.  Drain it, then season with extra virgin olive oil and salt and pepper to taste.  Place pasta on a plate, then spoon over the Syrah cream sauce with salmon.  Garnish it with the Parmigiano-Reggiano and the remaining half of the fresh herbs.  Top it off with freshly sliced tomato halves, and enjoy with a glass of Frey Biodynamic Syrah!

(Recipe copyrighted © Tamara Frey, 20111. All right reserved)

Molly Frey
 
August 29, 2011 | Molly Frey

Hedging for the bees

The beekeepers at Frey vineyards have collaborated the past several years to create a habitat specifically for bees. This past spring, Luke Frey helped install a bee border to support the pollinators of our locality, and now this hedgerow has come into full bloom. Master gardener Kate Frey helped choose plants that would be beneficial to the bees by having a late-summer onset of blossoms and a drought tolerance for our California clime. Every day I see the bees taking full advantage of the precious August nectars, and I'm looking forward to the future of this perennial garden space.


Preparing the bee hedgerowLuke Frey preparing the bare land for the bee border.


Plants for the bee borderPlants in the pots, ready for planting in the bee border.


Bee plants are plantedThe bee hedgerow takes root.


Bee border in full bloomThe hegerow this August, with the plants in bloom, offering sweet flowers for the bees.

Frey Vineyards
 
August 15, 2011 | Frey Vineyards

Photos from recent Frey Organic Wine Club party and dinner

A good time was had by all at our recent Wine Club dinner, with around 50 guests who enjoyed sumptuous organic cuisine by Chef Tamara Frey and other collaborators of the culinary arts. Below are some photos of the event we'd like to share with you. We hope you can make it to our next dinner and celebration of organic food and wine (to be announced).

Nicole and Katrina
Dinner organizers extraordinaires, Nicole & Katrina.

Guests relaxing at Organic Wine Club dinner.
Guests relaxing in front of the winery, under the oaks.

Organic sensory garden.
Guests take a tour of the wine sensory garden, a place to match wines with freshly picked herbs.

Table
Tables set, menus laid out, salivating commences.

Maidens serve the guests.
Young maidens serve the guests.

Live music.
Live music.

Fresh baked bread.
Freshly baked organic bread from the outdoor oven made by Matthew Frey.

Good meal had by all.
A good time had by all.

Frey Vineyards
 
August 4, 2011 | Frey Vineyards

Frey Biodynamic Wines proudly served at fundraiser with Willie Nelson

Willie NelsonAmerican music icon Willie Nelson recently received the 2011 Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance Visionary Award in San Francisco. Sponsored by environmental nonprofits Amazon Watch and Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance, the event focused on how living local can have a positive effect on people around the world.

Frey Biodynamic Wines were proudly donated to this event.

Read more on the Huffington Post.

Frey Vineyards
 
July 28, 2011 | Frey Vineyards

Survey finds most people want their food organic

Demand for organic food is ever growing, as confirmed by another poll. This is always good news as organic food production is better for everyone's health, and for the planet, in so many ways.

As summarized from ThePacker.com: "...A majority of Americans pick organically produced foods over conventionally produced when given the choice, according to a new poll... Among the reasons for choosing organic, survey participants cited supporting local growers and health concerns..."

Paul Frey planting organic melons.
Winemaker and vegetarian Paul Frey and his sons planting organic watermelons in vineyard.

Eliza Frey
 
July 28, 2011 | Eliza Frey

Organic Wine Sorbet

Organic wine sorbet

Try out this easy and delicious recipe for a refreshing summertime treat.  We made two versions of the recipe: Cabernet Sauvignon with rosemary and Sauvignon Blanc with Tarragon. But there are countless variations and you can eliminate the alcohol or adapt your sorbet to your creative whims. A quick internet search yields dozens of ideas, from champagne grapefruit to red wine with clove, and even hot toddy!  Whatever your preference, the basic recipe below will get you started and you can elaborate and embellish from there. The recipe is good for 4-6 hearty servings.  Have fun and enjoy!

Ingredients:
1 cup spring water or filtered water
3/4 cup organic sugar, or honey, or white grape juice
(Note on sweeteners:  We found that heavier red wines absorb the flavor of sugar and the sweetness is more intense for white wines.  So for white wines we recommend using a little less sweetener.)
1 1/2 cup wine
1/2 cup lemon juice
herbs and spices to taste (lemon zest is great for white wines)

We suggest either Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc with lemon mint, basil, tarragon, and Zinfandel or Merlot with cinnamon, ginger or cloves.  Be bold and experiment!

Directions:
1) Boil water
2) Stir in sugar, honey or juice until dissolved completely
3) Cover and cool
4) Stir in wine, lemon juice and spices
5) Taste your mixture and make any adjustments. This is your last chance to adjust the sweetness, tartness or spiciness!
6) Prepare in an ice cream maker or see the freezer instructions below.

Freezer Instructions:
If you don’t have an ice cream maker you can still make wonderful sorbet. The traditional trick is to interrupt the freezing process as many times as possible so you don’t end up with a block of flavored ice. However, if pinched for time, you can freeze it all at once, then remove it from the freezer and stir it as it softens. When it reaches the desired consistency, you can re-freeze it and serve it later.

To freeze:
1) Pour liquid sorbet mixture into a large baking dish. The depth of the liquid should be about 1/2 inch.
2) Place the dish in the freezer, making sure not to spill. 
3) Every 20-40 minutes remove the dish from the freezer and stir with a flat wooden spoon or a plastic spatula, or freeze all at once and stir as it softens, as mentioned above.

Derek Dahlen
 
July 26, 2011 | Derek Dahlen

Wheat between the vines – Year 2

We just completed our second wheat harvest, all of it grown between rows of our organic vineyards. This cereal harvest is a part of our ongoing experimentation with growing local organic food with the wine grapes.

Organic wheat in wine grape vineyard.
Ripe organic wheat ready for harvest between the vines.

This year brought some changes to the wheat program, as Frey Vineyards bought out the other members of the group that originally purchased the mini-combine, while they upgraded their own machine for wheat harvesting in Mendocino County.  Check out their website at Mendocino Grain Project.  Having our own combine now gives us more flexibility for timing the harvest and experimenting with different crops. 

Combine harvesting wheat in wine grape vineyard.
Matthew Frey running the combine in the Frey Potter Valley vineyard.

A repair on the combine allowed us to harvest the wheat more efficiently. It now reaps a much larger percentage of the crop and the grains are coming out cleaner. The grinding stone also got a facelift, as Matthew Frey installed a new motor with variable speed, allowing us to fine-tune the grinding process. 

Harvesting wheat in grape vineyard.
Derek and Matthew harvesting organic wheat from between rows of organic winegrapes.

The crop in our Redwood Valley vineyards weighed in at over one thousand pounds. At our Potter Valley vineyard, which has very fertile soils, we pulled in over 3,000 pounds!  Time to get baking!  We hope to offer samples of the flour to our wine club members.  You can join here! We will also be serving bread from our homegrown wheat at our upcoming midsummer party, Saturday, August 6th. Come and taste the wonder of fresh ground grains!

Eliza Frey
 
July 24, 2011 | Eliza Frey

Sunflower oil: a blooming venture

Organic sunflower plantings.
Young organic sunflowers at Frey Vineyards.

At Frey Vineyards this year we are experimenting with growing sunflowers to press for high quality organic oils.  Sunflower oil is great for cooking and as a body oil.  The plants also provide excellent food for our ranch bees as the flowers mature.  Sunflower oil is the most important source of food oil in the world, and we are excited to start producing it here.

We chose the Russian cultivar Peredovik sunflower (Helianthus annus). While most sunflowers have an oil content of 25-35%, the peredovic can yield up to 50% oil from its small black seeds. The Peredovic sunflower also has a very short growing season of about 12 weeks which allows plenty of time to maturity despite our wet and soggy spring this year.  We will harvest in the fall and press the seeds in our cold-press seed press. This year we expect about 25 gallons and hope to expand in the future.

The sunflower project fits nicely into our ever-expanding quest for more local sources of basic food products.  We can harvest them with our small combine, which is also used for harvesting wheat that is interplanted in our vineyards.  The spent press cake of the sunflower is a high quality feed for livestock and the stalks will make a great addition to our compost piles.
We will keep you posted about our progress!